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Calder v. Jones

From lawbrain.com

Calder v. Jones, 465 U.S. 783, 104 S. Ct. 1482, 79 L. Ed. 2d 804, (1984), is a civil procedure case in which the Supreme Court held that a state has personal jurisdiction over any party whose actions intentionally reach another party in the state and are the basis for the cause of action.

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Contents

Summary of Case Facts

Calder is the president and editor of National Enquirer. South, a reporter, wrote an article that accused Jones of having a drinking problem that was so severe that it affected her acting career. Calder reviewed the article and edited it to its final form for publication. Jones brought a suit for libel in California. South and Calder challenged California’s personal jurisdiction, since neither had any physical contacts with California, particularly as it pertained to this article. South did rely on sources from California, and Jones life and career were centered in California.

Issue

Whether California has personal jurisdiction over South and Calder through their targeting of Jones with this article.

Holding and Law

Yes. The United States Supreme Court held that California had personal jurisdiction over any party whose actions intentionally reach another party in the state and are the basis for the cause of action. Calder and South’s actions intentionally reached Jones in the state of California and are the basis for the cause of action. The harm was suffered in California and was aimed at a California resident.

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